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Drive Re-use Question

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by The Great Inert, Oct 11, 2012.

  1. The Great Inert

    The Great Inert New Member

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    Jun 20, 2012
    I'm thinking seriously of upgrading to a Premiere soon and have two questions.

    1. Does the Premiere support external enclosures, and if it does, does it have a drive size limit?

    2. The 1TB drive I have in my series 2 is about half full. If I put this drive in an external and hooked it up to a Premiere, would I be able to watch the shows I've already recorded?

    3. If the Premiere wouldn't immediately allow me to watch the shows, is there a hack I could apply to the kernel that would?

    Many thanks! :)
     
  2. lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

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    San...
    No. Only certain WD extrernal drives are supported. One can, however, upgrade the internal drive, which is what I would recommend in any case.

    No, but you could copy the shows over to a PC via TiVoToGo using kmttg, Galleon, a web browser, etc., or you could copy them to the Premier via MRV.

    No. No one has successfully hacked a Premier. If you want to consider mopdifying a TiVo, you need to go with a Series III class machine, not a Premier. Indeed, that is one reason I do not recommend the Premier. The S3 is a much more capable platform if one is willing to break out a soldering iron and a PC running Linux.
     
  3. steve614

    steve614 what ru lookin at?

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    LOL, you make it sound easy. Replacing the capacitors on the power supply is easy.
    SMD soldering is a little more complicated.

    ;)
     
  4. Arcady

    Arcady Stargate Fan

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    Philadelphia...
    I'd say you should copy the shows to a PC, then they are available on any TiVo on your network. You also won't be wasting 500 gigs of your new TiVo's drive on SD shows.


    P.S. Calling it a "Premier" over and over and over is not going to change the fact that it is, in fact, called a Premiere.
     
  5. lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

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    San...
    Yes, although the PROM is not one of the gawdawful high denisty, high pin count SMD devices. It's well within the capability of anyone who is good with a soldering iron, and people who are good enough with a soldering iron are within arm's reach of everyone. One can always have a friend do it or pay someone to do it. It's not like trying to find someone who can build a jet fighter.
     
  6. lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

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    San...
    Huh. I never noticed that.
     
  7. lillevig

    lillevig Hot in West Texas

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    San Angelo, TX
     
  8. unitron

    unitron Active Member

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    Having done both, I'd call swapping out SMD devices a little more than a little more complicated.

    :D
     
  9. poppagene

    poppagene User

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    Dec 29, 2001
     
  10. mattack

    mattack Active Member

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    What about the security chip? (whatever the lifetime-ness is tied to)
     
  11. unitron

    unitron Active Member

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    The TiVo Service Number is what's in the TiVo, Inc., database next to where it has a record of the account status for that TiVo.

    Up through the original Series 3 it was contained on the "crypto chip", which is a square Surface Mount Device with 8 or 10 pins on each of the 4 sides.

    Moving this to another of the same model motherboard turns the new motherboard into the old TiVo, so to speak.



    When the Series 3 HD and HD XL came along, the crypto chip was no longer a discrete integrated circuit but had been "integrated" into another larger more complicated chip which requires considerably more sophisticated equipment to solder and de-solder and re-solder, so that's no longer a realistic option.
     
  12. alansh

    alansh New Member

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    Phoenix, AZ
    I believe the serial number is actually in the CPU from the Series3 forward.

    Starting with the Premiere, the CPU has an internal boot ROM that's executed first that does a signature check on the main ROM, which makes replacing the ROM unworkable. And the CPU is a 34x34 ball grid array chip. Good luck unsoldering that.
     
  13. unitron

    unitron Active Member

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    Or in the case of certain laptop computers, good luck keeping it soldered.
     
  14. mattack

    mattack Active Member

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    Sorry, I was really indirectly asking if moving that was "well within the capability of anyone who is good with a soldering iron".

    We've talked of this before.. I guess I should go find my dead S3 drive (but it spins when it gets power) and try to buy an equivalent drive to swap controller boards, hoping that is the issue.. If THAT works (and a computer can 'see' the drive), then I might pay someone to move the crypto chip between S3s… Just to revive it..
     
  15. unitron

    unitron Active Member

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    Nowadays a drive made a few days earlier or later may not be "the same" enough for the board swap trick to work.
     
  16. mattack

    mattack Active Member

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    I thought if I got the same model + firmware version of the controller it would be good enough.

    The drive's already dead(ish), I'm unlikely to make it WORSE.
     
  17. unitron

    unitron Active Member

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    Refresh my memory, what brand and model drive and have you hooked it to a computer and run the manufacturer's diagnostic long test on it?
     

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