1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Copy Tivo HD Hard Drive using Mac OSX 10.7 or Bootcamp (Windows 8)

Discussion in 'TiVo Help Center' started by TheDarkPhoenix, Feb 24, 2014.

  1. TheDarkPhoenix

    TheDarkPhoenix New Member

    13
    0
    Oct 10, 2010
    I am very very sorry if this has already been answered on another thread, but I've been searching and my frustrations have gotten the better of me. I just want to copy/clone my Tivo HD's hard drive (1TB). I've looked up and downloaded MFSLive and JMFS I can't figure out how to do it.

    Can someone please advise me?

    I'd like to copy the drives using my USB drive enclosures (aka put the new HDD and the Tivo HDD in USB drive enclosures and clone that way). I tried to follow the instructions on the MFSLive web site and burned a bootable disk, which didn't work. I also downloaded & opened WinMFS in Windows 8 via bootcamp and the drives don't show.. >sigh<

    So again, can someone please give me a step by step? I have no idea what I'm missing... thanks in advance!
     
  2. RusRus

    RusRus New Member

    164
    0
    Apr 8, 2013
    Chula Vista, CA
    Pros:
    Copies over everything including recorded shows
    · Better error handling if bad sectors found
    Cons:
    · Takes long time if you have many recorded shows
    · Needs source and destination drive(s) connected at the same time

    1. Download WinMFS
    2. Unzip the File
    3. Setup your computer. Turn off your computer. Connect the two docking stations with the HDD’s plugged in and turn on the power. Turn on your computer.
    4. Double Click on the WinMFS.exe program to launch it.
    (If using Vista, right click then run it as an"Administrator.")
    5. Select Source Drive
    6. Tools->Mfscopy
    7. Select Destination Drive
    8. Click on Start Button
    9. Wait (perhaps several hours) ...
    10. Click "Yes" when asked to expand the drive
    11. Switch to Destination Drive
    12. Tools->Mfsinfo and check Destination Drive.
    13. All Done!
     
  3. jmbach

    jmbach der Neuerer

    1,624
    20
    Jan 1, 2009
    Depending on the MAC you are using, you can try booting the MAC with the JMFS CD with the drives connected. My MacBook circa 2009 worked. Newer ones might not.
     
  4. TheDarkPhoenix

    TheDarkPhoenix New Member

    13
    0
    Oct 10, 2010
    This is copied directly from the MFSLive web site and is not working for me... that's why i asked for help
     
  5. jmbach

    jmbach der Neuerer

    1,624
    20
    Jan 1, 2009
    Have you booted the JMFS cd in your Mac.
     
  6. TheDarkPhoenix

    TheDarkPhoenix New Member

    13
    0
    Oct 10, 2010
    Im going to try that right now and get back to you in just a bit... I thought you could only boot of JMFS in Windows and not from a Mac
     
  7. jmbach

    jmbach der Neuerer

    1,624
    20
    Jan 1, 2009
    JMFS iso is Linux distro. It boots in almost any computer. If the drivers are there for your USB ports it should work.

    Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk
     
  8. TheDarkPhoenix

    TheDarkPhoenix New Member

    13
    0
    Oct 10, 2010
    I just tried to book from the JMFS CD and it gave me the Circle with the line through it and the folder with the "?" blinking interchangeably.
     
  9. unitron

    unitron Active Member

    16,400
    5
    Apr 28, 2006
    semi-coastal NC

    spike, the guy at mfslive.org, took the old MFS Tools, which were designed for a Linux command line environment, and turned them into the MFS Live cd, which boots the computer into a Linux command line environment whether it has any hard drives connected or not, so it ignores and bypasses whatever Operating System the computer usually boots into and runs on.

    The most recent version is 1.4, and it's available somewhere on that site for download as an .iso file, which has to be burned to a cd-r "as an image" so that things are in the right place on the disk for it to be bootable.

    I've used it for TiVo work and for stuff not directly related to TiVos, and recommend having a copy on hand.

    spike also wrote WinMFS, which is a program that runs on/in Windows XP or later--you have to run it with admin privileges for it to be able to see hard drives, and I don't know if it runs on anything newer than Windows 7, or if it'll work if you're running a "virtual" version of Windows.

    Both WinMFS and the MFS Live programs on the MFS Live cd are intended for Series 1, 2, and 3 TiVos.

    When TiVo brought out the Series 4, the Premiere, it changed some stuff about the hard drive structure that keeps spike's stuff from working properly on anything newer than the S3 platform models.

    If you want to "Xerox" your current 1TB drive to another 1TB drive, and both have the same LBA number, then you can do that without TiVo-specific software.

    The aforementioned MFS Live cd v1.4 has the old standby Unix/Linux utility

    dd

    as well as something which works similarly but offers more options and flexibility called

    dd_rescue

    There is a similar program called

    ddrescue

    (or you might see it referred to in some places as GNU Ddrescue--long story)

    which is available, along with bunch of other stuff that might come in handy some day, on the Ultimate Boot CD, a free copy of the .iso of which can be downloaded and burned "as an image" to cd-r.

    With one of those 3, you can do a byte for byte copy from one drive to the other, and since it's just copying those 1s and 0s, it doesn't matter whether it's a TiVo drive, a Mac drive, a Windows drive, even a drive that's been erased and had random stuff written to it--whatever's on the source drive will be written to the target drive in the same place.

    If you tell me the brand and model number of both drives, and the model number of the TiVo (starts with TCD), and tell me what the end objective here is, I may be able to offer further assistance.
     
  10. TheDarkPhoenix

    TheDarkPhoenix New Member

    13
    0
    Oct 10, 2010
    Thanks. The TiVo model is TCD652160

    The Tivo source HDD, which is a Western Digital (WD10EADS) 1.0TB drive is failing (no sound and Tivo hangs on "Almost there... just a few more minutes")

    ...so I would like to copy the source drive to the new Seagate Barracuda (ST1000DM003) 1.0TB drive I bought.

    Any ideas?
     
  11. unitron

    unitron Active Member

    16,400
    5
    Apr 28, 2006
    semi-coastal NC
    You don't know for certain that the WD is failing until you remove the drive from the TiVo, hook it to a computer, and test it there.

    While you're doing that you can check on the very real possiblility that the TiVo power supply has "capacitor plague".

    In fact, if it's a Series 2 or Series 3 platform unit, you should eliminate the power supply as a problem before doing any other troubleshooting because there's such a good chance there's something wrong with it.

    If you see any bulged or leaking caps on the power supply board, you know that it does need repair.

    If you don't, it might very well anyway, but you'll need a voltmeter to check the DC output lines.

    Let me know if I need to walk you through that.


    Go here

    http://www.ultimatebootcd.com/download.html

    go to the bottom of the page where it says mirror sites,

    find one geographically near you and click on the drive icon

    [​IMG]

    to download the .iso file, which you then burn "as an image" to a cd-r, so that it'll be bootable.

    It's got lots of stuff, including the WD diagnostic software.

    Run the WD short test on that EADS. If it passes, run the long test.

    If necessary

    ddrescue

    is on there somewhere as well, and you can use it to "Xerox" the WD to the Seagate.

    (they appear to have the same LBA number--1953525168--so the source drive, which is the input file for ddrescue, will reach its end just as the output file, the target drive, reaches its full capacity)

    But first run the Seagate long test on it before putting it into service.

    Even brand new drives can arrive with problems.
     
  12. TheDarkPhoenix

    TheDarkPhoenix New Member

    13
    0
    Oct 10, 2010
    That's actually what started the whole thing. The sound started going out on my Tivo and I would have to unplug it and re-plug it in multiple times and it would come back sometimes and sometimes not. I checked the capacitors throughly and non are bulging or leaking. I was actually hoping that would be the issue because soldering it would have been a lot easier and cost effective.

    That's actually where I stopped with trying to diagnose the capacitor. I don't have a voltmeter and have no Idea how to check the DC output lines so a walk-thru would be great just in case.

    I'll definitely keep you posted when I try this in the AM. If I don't stop now, I'll keep going be up all night...
     
  13. TheDarkPhoenix

    TheDarkPhoenix New Member

    13
    0
    Oct 10, 2010
    So a quick update, I was able to boot from the Ultimate Bootable CD using rEFIt to select it (for some reason holding down the "C" button didn't work) but for some reason I wasn't to move the cursor/select anything. Maybe because I am using a non-apple keyboard on my Mac Pro...

    In any event, I ended up using rEFIt to boot the Ubuntu Rescue Remix cd I made via the instructions listed here How to clone a failing Tivo drive... And followed the steps. I had to take out all my HDDs and insert my Tivo drives in their place. The whole process took about 5 hours, but it looks like the failing hard drive was the reason for my Tivo's lack of sound & inability to start up and not capacitor plague.

    I appreciate all the help, unitron! I don't think I would have figured it out without your help
     
  14. unitron

    unitron Active Member

    16,400
    5
    Apr 28, 2006
    semi-coastal NC
    Congratulations, but remember, what you probably have is a power supply that hasn't gone bad "yet".
     
  15. TheDarkPhoenix

    TheDarkPhoenix New Member

    13
    0
    Oct 10, 2010

    Hm. Any suggestions? I'm actually thinking about buying another TiVO HD and modifying it as well, so this is all very helpful
     

Share This Page