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Combining antennaes?

Discussion in 'TiVo Roamio DVRs' started by consumedsoul, Sep 1, 2013.

  1. Sep 1, 2013 #1 of 26
    consumedsoul

    consumedsoul Member

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    Jan 13, 2013
    I use a Roamio basic combined w/ a Mohu antennae (amplified) and am not getting solid signals on a couple stations unless I move it to another indoor location, but if I do then the other stations lose signal - any chance I can purchase another Mohu antennae (same model), get a splitter and put both antennas in their respective locations to get a 'consolidated/combined' better signal? Sorry I'm totally ignorant in this area.

    Or should I be looking to purchase a better OTA antennae?
     
  2. Sep 1, 2013 #2 of 26
    Scooby Doo

    Scooby Doo New Member

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    Dec 18, 2002
    No, you can't combine antennas. Get a better antenna, preferably an outdoor one.
     
  3. Sep 1, 2013 #3 of 26
    Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    Nevada
  4. Sep 1, 2013 #4 of 26
    consumedsoul

    consumedsoul Member

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    Jan 13, 2013
    What if I live in an Apt and am restricted to indoor, any better models you can recommend vs. a Mohu?
     
  5. Sep 1, 2013 #5 of 26
    janry

    janry New Member

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    Jan 2, 2003
    Nashville, TN
    I've combined antennas before using a splitter with some degree of success. I'll just say you aren't going to hurt anything to try except the cost of the 2nd antenna and splitter if you don't already have them.

    However, I suggest you get a TVFool report and see what it suggest.

    http://www.tvfool.com/
     
  6. Sep 1, 2013 #6 of 26
    Davelnlr_

    Davelnlr_ Member

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    Jan 12, 2011
    North...
    IF the two (unamplified) antennas are directional (the indoor ones usually are not), and you can aim them in such a way as each one nulls out the stations the other is picking up, and assuming the signal strength is good on both for their respective stations, the splitter method will work.

    What usually happens is the same station will be picked up by both antennas, and when combined, will be slightly out of phase and cancel each other out, or worse, add together with slightly different timing causing digital dropouts (used to be ghosts in the analog days).

    Even in an apt, you can usually get a 4 bay screen antenna and some good quality coax, and mount the antenna high up in a closet, and run the coax to the tv. This would work much better for most people than gimmick antennas with built in amplifiers which usually amplify more noise than signal. If the signal isnt present at the antenna terminal, no amount of amplification is going to help. Amplification is basically used to boost the signal AND some amount of noise to overcome the attenuation in long coax runs to the TV, or where the signal is split to multiple rooms. Except in the case of satellite reception, amplifiers are usually not designed to do what most people think they do.
     
  7. Sep 1, 2013 #7 of 26
    Joe Siegler

    Joe Siegler New Member

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    May 10, 2000
    Garland, TX
    I had one of those (amongst others) in trying to find a good antenna for my home, and found out that they don't work for me due to interference in the walls. I wrote about my trials picking the right antenna here.

    I'll back that. I love tvfool's reports. Antennaweb has gotten better lately, but tvfool still has more info and types of maps available.
     
  8. Sep 1, 2013 #8 of 26
    Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    Apr 17, 2000
    Nevada
    When I bought the antenna I lived in a place with no access to the attic, so I had to go with something I could attach directly. If I were buying one now I'd probably go for an attic mount one because I have easy access to the attic. But it sounds like the OP lives in an apartment so he's pretty much stuck with something her can keep in doors. Although I have heard of people putting those attic mount ones in closets and having them work. If he can't get a good signal from a TV top one that may be the next step.
     
  9. Sep 1, 2013 #9 of 26
    Joe Siegler

    Joe Siegler New Member

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    May 10, 2000
    Garland, TX
    Those flat ones can work better in a window in an apartment, but it all depends on what direction the window is facing, obviously.
     
  10. StevesWeb

    StevesWeb Grumpy Old Geek

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    Dec 26, 2008
    Geek Hill,...
    The indoor antenna that Dan203 linked to above gave me much better results in my previous home than any of the amplified type.

    The 4 bay bowtie Davenlr suggests was my standard suggestion to customers when I was a TV repairman.
     
  11. consumedsoul

    consumedsoul Member

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    Jan 13, 2013
    Picked up a Clearstream Micron XG (Antennas Direct) from Best Buy to try to replace my Mohu, getting more consistent signals from ABC, NBC, CBS, Fox (the 4 I mainly care about), and no longer getting solid signals from PBS/CW (the 2 I don't mind not having).

    Set it to one level (4 strengths available) of 'amplification' for stronger signal on some stations, any more doesn't really add benefit.

    Interesting effect, I had it sitting next to the HD TV, I moved it behind it and the strength levels actually went up (around +5 to +10) on all stations (bizarre) according to TiVo's channel strength indicator.

    Some stations are still a bit/slightly 'noisy' if you look up really close (e.g. at TV station static logos that's there), but otherwise very watchable.

    Going to buy a couple more units from Best Buy to experiment tomorrow...
     
  12. tenthplanet

    tenthplanet Member

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    Mar 5, 2004
    The mohu is primarily a UHF antennae so if you are trying get VHF you would have to something designed for both. If you're trying indoor antennaes you need something that has rabbit ears and a loop at a minimum. The problem you're running into is fairly common. A little trial and error with a long enough cable to move the antennae around can work wonders sometimes.
     
  13. Leon WIlkinson

    Leon WIlkinson TiVo Gone Wild

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    Feb 13, 2000
    TiVo Town
    So how good is the Roamio Tuner, >= Premiere or >= to a TiVoHD?
     
  14. tenthplanet

    tenthplanet Member

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    Mar 5, 2004
    As weird as it sounds sometimes a properly placed person can help reception, this goes to back the days of analog tv. People can be like super aluminum foil. Since no one wants to play reflector for any amount of time you might want to try some foil on a piece cardboard in the place where you were standing.
     
  15. StevesWeb

    StevesWeb Grumpy Old Geek

    704
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    Dec 26, 2008
    Geek Hill,...

    I hope to be able to help answer this question after Thursday when my Roamio arrives.

    My existing Premiere XL receives 133 digital channels but only after I bought a new outdoor antenna. Compared to the HDHomerun, older Sling with ATSC tuner, and my Panasonic TV the Premier has always performed worst. Channels which were consistently fine on other tuners would suffer loss of sync on the Premiere XL.
     
  16. ncbill

    ncbill Member

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    Sep 1, 2007
    Western NC
    IMHO, the Roamio is better than the Series 3 at OTA.

    I can pick up one out of market (transmitters roughly 60 miles away) station with the TivoHD, but 3 add'l from that market with the Roamio.

    And that's with splitting the signal from a 2-bay antenna between two Tivos.

     
  17. 9300170

    9300170 Member

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    Feb 20, 2003
    Tempe, AZ
  18. k2ue

    k2ue Retired RF Engineer

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    May 9, 2002
    Victor, NY
    This the correct way to do it -- using a simple combiner/splitter will cost you 3-4dB SNR on all channels, plus add multipath problems.
     
  19. MikeAndrews

    MikeAndrews Registered abuser

    14,222
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    Jan 17, 2002
    Northern...
    You CAN combine antennas that are aimed in different directions just by using a 2-way splitter connected backwards. Your only issue is making sure the beam is narrow so you minimize multipath (ghosting) with both antennas seeing the same transmitters, which is less of an issue with a digital signal.
     

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