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CBS Colorized I Love Lucy Christmas Special

Discussion in 'Now Playing - TV Show Talk' started by Generic, Oct 23, 2013.

  1. Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey

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    It's the next progression in TV, that's what I meant. This is the progression I think of with TV tech.

    Small B&W pictures
    Larger B*W pictures as TV's popularity grew
    Color replacing B&W
    Solid state TVs replacing tube TVs improving picture quality (the end of rolling TV pictures and such)
    Stereo TV
    RP TVs (first large screen TVs)
    (the above two might be reversed)
    Wide screen TVs
    HDTV and flat screens

    To me anyway, getting my first HDTV felt the same to me as my parents getting their first color TV. There was little content outside of a few shows and gradually over time replacing the old format.

    I don't hear for instance any big issues with porting old SD shows like Seinfeld into a wide screen format the way we do about colorizng B&W. Nobody thinks it's abnormal, or looks funny, or just wrong.
     
  2. mrdbdigital

    mrdbdigital The TBS Archives TCF Club

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    Ted caught a tremendous amount of resistance and protest to his colorizing of old movies. I think that's why he finally stopped.

    CNN is a very small shadow of its' former self. It's really sad in a way, and what most people don't know is the the downfall started when Ted was forced out of the company by the AOL Time Warner merger. With Ted gone, the vision was gone, and the new execs just screwed with everything until CNN went down the tubes. This is a common topic of discussion in the CNN Alumni group on Facebook. A lot of the original employees are quite irritated with what has been done to CNN. I think any hope for recovery is too late; CNN is too far gone to save. I give it only a few more years.
     
  3. TonyD79

    TonyD79 Active Member

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    I believe some of those shows were actually done in widescreen but cropped for showing in SD.

    Again, the difference would be altering after. There is a huge contingent of OAR advocates. I am one. But the change from OAR is often forgiven if it was part of the original vision.

    There is absolutely no comparison you can find.
     
  4. getreal

    getreal postcrastinator

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    OAR? Why couldn't you use the full phrase along with the acronym before resorting to the acronym alone? Not everybody here has access to your brain. :)
     
  5. TonyD79

    TonyD79 Active Member

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    Because it is a standard acronymn on the interwebs when talking about video. Would you expect someone to define RBI in a baseball forum? Or GNP when talking about the economy?

    Oh. And google it if you don't know.
     
  6. Langree

    Langree The Gimp

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    Since you asked so nicely...

    Original Aspect Ratio
     
  7. TonyD79

    TonyD79 Active Member

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    The way he asked is exactly WHY I didn't tell him.
     
  8. tvmaster2

    tvmaster2 Active Member

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    if DesiLu could have afforded to shoot color film, would they have? or did they shoot B&W because at the time color television hadn't even fully developed?
     
  9. waynomo

    waynomo My One Time TCF Club

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    There's a whole development of broadcasting to consider. The earliest TV shows were broadcast live with B&W cameras. It took some time to figure out how to even record a show just so there was a copy. Forget rebroadcasting something. Eventually they figured out how to broadcast something that was on film. My point is there were processes involved before they started using film. (forget color film)
     
  10. Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey

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    In a way CNN's situation is similar to what happened to Apple after Jobs, the company's visionary was forced out. The "suits" only vision is making money and with CNN (as with Apple) it couldn't be sustained without a clear vision as to what the company should be. You wonder if Ted was allowed back in, assuming he'd even want to do it, if he could turn CNN around.
     
  11. Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey

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    Were there even enough color sets in that era to make it worth the expense? It's totally different than movies where a theater owner would probably have projectors that could handle color and B&W because there have been both for years. I don't think color TV even took off until the early to mid 1960s. It would have been pointless to go to the expense for DesiLu.
     
  12. waynomo

    waynomo My One Time TCF Club

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    Early on shooting in color wasn't an option. They didn't have the technology to do it. Later on it might have been an expense issue.
     
  13. tvmaster2

    tvmaster2 Active Member

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    however, Desi Arnez insisted on doing the show on film, likely so it would be easier to distribute, physically, wherever he wanted. 'I Love Lucy' was one of the first worldwide syndication mega-successes (remember the scene from 'Crocodile Dundee').
    If there had been color at the time, Arnez would have shot in color, and likely wouldn't mind the colorization updating for future compatibility. I mean it's all about her red hair, yeah?
    But like a lot of people, I personally think you change history when you start mucking with these things. It's a paradox
     
  14. waynomo

    waynomo My One Time TCF Club

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    I was just reading up on this. I knew that Kinescopes were the process they used to record shows during the early years. The quality was really horrible and was the reason I Love Lucy was the first show filmed. I hadn't realized that.

    From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinescope

     
  15. mrdbdigital

    mrdbdigital The TBS Archives TCF Club

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    I'm sure Ted would give it a try if he was allowed back in, but I don't know if even he could save CNN now. For a long time after Ted was forced out, there was a popular rumor (never confirmed) that Ted was going to start over with a new media company and a new news network. Then the AOL stock tanked and he lost most of his fortune.

    All his former employees from the parent company TBS, and from CNN wanted to give this a go, and a lot of us told Ted we would go with him to start over. I personally told him this in the elevator one day at CNN Center, and he just grinned and thanked me for my loyalty. I never regretted my days at TBS, just regretted that I made the stupid decision to leave the company.

    Ted has often said the two biggest regrets in his life are: 1) Losing CNN, and 2) Losing Jane Fonda.
     
  16. Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey

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    Ted, quite often was looked at as a goofball but he really was a visionary. When you think about it, WTBS, the first big time "superstation" was the model for what SO many cable channels have become. And CNN, in the early days proved what 24/7 news could be. The Gulf War being it's shining moment.
     
  17. alansh

    alansh New Member

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    For a long time there was a hefty price-premium on color vs. B&W film, so if they weren't counting on a color release it would be hard to justify. "The Long Long Trailer" (1953) starring Lucy and Desi was released to theaters in color. [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Qbm-T_OSa4[/media]

    Count me as one of the people irritated by changing the original aspect ratio. For SD shows shot on 35mm film, it's some combination of using portions of the 35mm frame that would have been outside the NTSC safe frame and cropping the top/bottom, and/or stretching the image.

    The first messes up the director's framing choices. Shot choices (tight, wide, two-shots) are very much part of the filmmaking process and part of the storytelling. Cropping just makes it look like an amateur photographer cutting off the top of everyone's heads.

    There's also often studio clutter outside the NTSC frame -- lights, the edges of sets, etc.

    Stretching makes everyone look like Jabba the Hut. I really hate that.

    For shows on videotape there's no larger frame, so the only way to make them widescreen is cropping and/or stretching.

    It is of course possible to rescan 35mm shows at 1080p and show them pillarboxed. You get the advantage of the higher resolution without messing up the framing.
     
  18. mattack

    mattack Active Member

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    In a book about "The Dick Van Dyke Show", Carl Reiner said they strongly considered going to color in the 3rd season. But they didn't.. I think due to cost.

    Also, even though nowadays many of those old shows aren't broadcast as much as they used to be (though you could probably argue that TV reruns are in the same "look at 20 years ago" thing that culture seems to do generally), later in the "substantial reruns" of those shows (my term, just when they were more popularly rerun), they would only run the color seasons and not the black and white seasons.

    Not the same thing at all, but there's still almost a whole season of Twilight Zone episodes (season 4) that I haven't seen, because they're hour long episodes that don't rerun. I know they're considered to be much worse, but even halfways decent "new" (to me) twilight zone episodes would be awesome. But they ALSO don't seem to ever show up on the streaming sites, even though the other seasons do show up.. So at some point I may actually just buy the DVD or BluRay set (and yeah, probably all seasons, as a completist). (I think 2 eps were edited together for a "TV movie" in the late 80s or early 90s.)

    When exactly are you referring to? Do you mean literally the 1930s-1940s era of TV, or 1950s? There were kinescopes of course, literally pointing a film camera at a TV screen. (I don't know exactly how the playback of film to TV works, but of course that was done too.)
     
  19. waynomo

    waynomo My One Time TCF Club

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    I was referring to late 40s early 50s. But it could be applied to earlier also. It was an evolution.

    Of course I was really mistaken based on this thread. I didn't realize that ILL was always filmed from the first episode. It was the first show to do that.
     
  20. mattack

    mattack Active Member

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    *Don't* do either of those. Pillarbox them.
     

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