1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Best Solutions for Adding Storage to PC for Tranferred Tivo Programs?

Discussion in 'TiVo Home Media Features & TiVoToGo' started by Ariette, Feb 25, 2013.

  1. hershey4

    hershey4 New Member

    179
    0
    May 31, 2006
    Red Sox Nation
    which would be a good reason not to use a drive letter. However, the network address of \\readyshare\blah\blah should be constant throughout the system and valid before any user logs in. I access that drive from other devices with no one logged in. TDT is not being smart here. I know... I know... that's one reason you don't use TDT... I assume the services TDT starts up are for AllUsers rather than a user. I would prefer it started up no services until I am ready to use it, but that's another story...

    What I meant by
    "On the PC, WMP accesses and plays from either location. So now I'm not sure of any benefit of keeping them inside the Tivo Desktop." ...​

    is that I could utilize my network drive by using TDT just for the transfer and then manually copy them over to the network drive. My PC can see them for whatever I may want to do with them there. My Tivo can see them for transfering/playing. I was trying to learn if there was any other reason to keep them on the hard drive in "My Tivo Recordings" visible to TDT. Seeing as you don't even like/use TDT, I guess you would say no. The underlying question is does TDT have any features I will be missing by moving my transferred files out immediately after transfer?
     
  2. hershey4

    hershey4 New Member

    179
    0
    May 31, 2006
    Red Sox Nation
    Duh lightbulb!!! That's not the question at all!!!

    Combining the two points above, the real solution is if I move my transferred files (manually) to my network drive, then my PC does not have to even be on and I can access network-hosted Tivo Recordings from my TV. That has to be a stronger advantage than leaving them on the hard drive for whatever.

    I'll have to try that the next time my PC is off to be sure none of those background PC services are involved. I don't think they will be.
     
  3. unitron

    unitron Active Member

    16,387
    2
    Apr 28, 2006
    semi-coastal NC
    Do you already have any experience with the TiVo Desktop program?

    I have found that, running the program on Windows XP, I can put into the My TiVo Recordings folder (where it wants to store the shows it copies from the TiVo or TiVos) shortcuts to partitions on other drives, and when I look at the computer's folder in the TiVo's Now Playing List, I can open it and the partitions are available there as folders.

    There are other programs for handling TiVo-PC relations, but I haven't gotten around to playing with any of them yet, I'm still to busy archiving Mom's doctor shows.
     
  4. wmcbrine

    wmcbrine Ziphead

    10,362
    22
    Aug 2, 2003
    This is one of the places where pyTivo has an advantage -- you don't have to set it up as an always-on server, but can start it and stop it on demand.
     
  5. unitron

    unitron Active Member

    16,387
    2
    Apr 28, 2006
    semi-coastal NC
    I have found it easier to just give the TiVos their own computers.
     
  6. Puppy76

    Puppy76 Active Member

    1,182
    0
    Oct 6, 2004
    Guys, if you're not using Tivo Desktop, what ARE you using?

    You can move the folder Tivo Desktop uses by default. Can't remember where they normally put it, but I put it on my desktop on systems with one drive, and usually have it on the second drive on systems with two drives (with a shortcut to it on my desktop).

    The only reason you'd need to keep files in the folder it transfers them to is if you want to transfer them back. I'd have no reason to ever transfer them back, but then I have no reason to take them out of that folder either.
     
  7. Puppy76

    Puppy76 Active Member

    1,182
    0
    Oct 6, 2004
    Why, out of curiosity? I mean could be handy to have a box dedicated to copying stuff to it and transcoding and stuff, depending on what you do with it...
     
  8. unitron

    unitron Active Member

    16,387
    2
    Apr 28, 2006
    semi-coastal NC
    Like practically everything else connected with Windows, it wants to put it all on the C: drive.
     
  9. Puppy76

    Puppy76 Active Member

    1,182
    0
    Oct 6, 2004
    Where else would it put it by default? I mean that's only normal a program's going to default to your default drive, particularly given most PCs only have a single drive.

    I just couldn't remember what exact location it stuck it in. Maybe in your personal files or something.
     
  10. unitron

    unitron Active Member

    16,387
    2
    Apr 28, 2006
    semi-coastal NC
    C:\Documents and Settings\unitron\My Documents\My TiVo Recordings

    (your username may vary)

    Of course I never leave it there, but put it on it's own partition, but that's where it puts it first without offering you a choice ahead of time.

    That's in XP, don't know if it's different in Vista on up.
     
  11. wmcbrine

    wmcbrine Ziphead

    10,362
    22
    Aug 2, 2003
    pyTivo.
     
  12. lrhorer

    lrhorer New Member

    6,922
    0
    Aug 31, 2003
    San...
    I will agree it is generally the best solution for a GoBack server, and what most people, including me, use. There are other solutions, however. Galleon is one. A NAS (like the ReadyNAS) that supports TiVo units is another. That said, I also agree pyTivo is probably the best solution for the OP, but it is wise to let people know there are other options, as well.
     
  13. lrhorer

    lrhorer New Member

    6,922
    0
    Aug 31, 2003
    San...
    Totally off-topic, but interestingly enough, I loaded Windows XP on a system just a couple of days ago, and it assigned H: to the hard drive.
     
  14. unitron

    unitron Active Member

    16,387
    2
    Apr 28, 2006
    semi-coastal NC
    Not counting the St. TiVo's Day Massacre problem, or pretending that they send out patches to the TiVos themselves to fix the actual problem, to what extent do ReadyNAS servers support TiVo?

    Do they show up in the NPL just like the MTR folder on a PC running TD?

    Is there any more to it than that?
     
  15. lrhorer

    lrhorer New Member

    6,922
    0
    Aug 31, 2003
    San...
    Yep. It is perfectly brain dead TDT does not allow a network resource to be specified.

    Right you are, me laddie!

    Well, I certainly do start pyTivo along with all the other services on the RAID server at boot time. There is really no point in not doing so, and it is far more convenient than having to run over to a PC to start it whenever I want to transfer a video. That said, pyTivo can easily be started or stopped from any PC in the house.

    Yeah or write a script to do it. That's a kludge, though. It's much easier just to run pyTivo on the file server.

    Well, TDT Plus does, but there are far better apps to handle those, as well, whihc don't have the limitations of TDT.
     
  16. lrhorer

    lrhorer New Member

    6,922
    0
    Aug 31, 2003
    San...
    I've never played with one, so I really can't say with any authority.
     
  17. NowPlaying

    NowPlaying Member

    135
    0
    Mar 7, 2002
    Menlo Park,...
    I added a hard drive to my desktop to store my video collection but it soon ran out of space. I recently bit-the-bullet and purchased a NAS for my file storage. I wrote about it on my blog here: http://www.craigharris.org/2013/02/21/my-new-synology-nas/

    It works great with PyTivo. I haven't tried running PyTivo on the NAS itself yet but I have read that it can be done.
     
  18. howards

    howards New Member

    76
    0
    Oct 31, 2007
    A quote from your blog:

    -------------
    When I ran out of room I added a 2TB data drive. Then it started getting fullÂ… If you are like many people you keep much of your file collection on an external USB drive. BAD! External drives are great for backups and Sneaker NetÂ’ting large files but horrible for storage as (at least in my experience) their failure rate is quite high.
    ------------

    The physical drives used in external (e.g., USB) drives and those you installed in your NAS are the same drives. Failure rate of the drives themselves should be identical, except for manufacturer differences.

    The only different points of failure would be your computer's hardware v.s. NAS hardware. Since most NAS servers are essentially packaged Linux computers, I think the hardware failure rate here would be similar as well. If you are running Windows, I'd give the nod to the NAS on a better software failure rate.
     
  19. lrhorer

    lrhorer New Member

    6,922
    0
    Aug 31, 2003
    San...
    Not necessarily. First of all, some USB enclosures are not very well vented, and the internal temps may be much higher in some cases. Probably more importantly, removable drives tend to get... well... removed. They tend to get bounced around a bit. This may well result in higher failure rates for the same piece of hardware used in various enclosures.
     
  20. howards

    howards New Member

    76
    0
    Oct 31, 2007
    Drives can be abused regardless of the enclosure that contains them. You think NAS drives aren't removable?

    If you're talking about industrial-strength NAS solutions that cost thousands, then I'd agree they are probably better cooled. Home NAS units aren't any better cooled than USB drives, IMO, and may be worse due to having multiple drives in close proximity.
     

Share This Page