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Bering Sea Gold - All Season Thread w/ spoilers

Discussion in 'Now Playing - TV Show Talk' started by jradosh, Jan 30, 2012.

  1. jradosh

    jradosh Newlywed

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    Herndon,...
    Watched the first episode and so far, so good. It has all the elements of Gold Rush Alaska but the people seem to actually know what they're doing (for the most part). We saw more gold that first episode than we have all season in Gold Rush Alaska. And it has cleavage. :)

    The guy living in the bus who seems so full of himself... seems a bit scripted to me. Can he really be that (what's the word?)... goofy?

    This show may be enough to get me to stop watching the other. :eek:
     
  2. Byteofram

    Byteofram Survivor of C-bus

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    Yeah, there was def a lot more gold in one episode than we normally see all season on Gold Rush. LOL! Hope the Hoffmans don't make the jump to the Bering Sea. Really liked this first episode though.
     
  3. Bob Coxner

    Bob Coxner Active Member

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    The Hoffmans have a goal of 100 ounces for the season. (Dream on) The large dredge has a goal of 1000 ounces and got 46 on their first day. Using the excavator bucket to paddle was amazing.

    Lots of interesting characters and this could easily become more enjoyable than Gold Rush.
     
  4. pmyers

    pmyers Well-Known Member

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    Boy...if you are going to "gold", this is the place to do it:

    No real big equipment needed, small crews, AND you can live in a town!
     
  5. pmyers

    pmyers Well-Known Member

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    I wonder if you have to have a "claim" to be out there. Can you just go wherever you want or are you leasing a particular area?
     
  6. jradosh

    jradosh Newlywed

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    One of the boats "arrived at its claim" according to the narration.
     
  7. pmyers

    pmyers Well-Known Member

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    Gilbert, AZ
    I did hear that which is what made me wonder.
     
  8. The Flush

    The Flush Not So Notable Member TCF Club

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    SO OH
    I like this better than Gold Rush so far. Probably because they actually find gold.

    I also wish they would address the issue of how the claims work. I also wonder how each dredge tracks where they have already dredged so that they don't keep doing the same area.

    Is it even legal to take a boat out to sea without working propulsion? It seems no one in the right mind would so that and this could be a scripted element just to show that you can row the boat with a beloved excavator.

    The deckhand who did not want to follow captain's orders should have had his ass kicked before being thrown off the boat.
     
  9. pmyers

    pmyers Well-Known Member

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    I totally agree. It seemed like somebody watched that episode of Mythbusters, thought it looked cool, and decided to put it into this episode.

    For a place known for daily storms, which can come up very quickly, it seems unlikely that somebody would take a boat out with no propolsion.
     
  10. Gary McCoy

    Gary McCoy Active Member

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    Yet they got 46 ounces of gold on that first day. I could see taking a risk for a substantial reward. But the dredge owner was the one that made the call, and the crew were the ones at risk.
     
  11. Bob Coxner

    Bob Coxner Active Member

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    What's the next level below "white trash"? These guys do get gold, and the large dredge gets a lot of it, but they live in housing that wouldn't be acceptable in the worst ghetto. They drive pieces of s**t trucks and cars. In this episode they get into a bar fight and one gets stabbed.

    I guess the guy living in an abandoned school bus is the lowest but the couple living in a canvas yurt on the beach is not far behind.
     
  12. Gregor

    Gregor save the princess save the world

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    I wonder if they are just summer residents and bought/rented whatever was available. Not like there's a new car dealer in town, stuff probably gets driven until it absolutely won't go any further.
     
  13. Gary McCoy

    Gary McCoy Active Member

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    Nome has changed a lot since I was there in 1972-73. It looks to be 3X larger in terms of size, and who knows about the population change.

    But it's still a wild and wooly town with no paved streets, wooden sidewalks that become enclosed sidewalks in Winter, and no building codes. It still appears to be the case that every 3rd business is a bar, a restaurant serving booze, or a liquor store.

    I spent 26 hours in town in 1972, during which time a person drove a snowmobile down the main drag and shot a law enforcement officer through a plate glass window. Unfortunately for me, my pilot and myself were witnesses and my flight out to my military base was delayed 24 hours. I ended up sharing a hotel room with another military guy who was on leave from another base. He was partying and it was an eye-opening experience. The Aleut prostitutes were - um - not very attractive to Western eyes.

    One year later (1973) as I was rotating out of the area, I was wise enough to have booked a connecting flight the same day, avoiding the layover in Nome. The bush pilot obligingly cut the layover time from 3 hours to one, flew around the area at my request, and I paid him an extra $100 for fuel and took aerial pictures of the entire area and town. I still have them.

    Nostalgic to see the place and how much it has changed - and not changed. But as you might guess, it's nowhere I would reccomend for tourists, or wives and children.
     
  14. DanB

    DanB New Member

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    the girl is saving up for a masters in opera? hmmm.
     
  15. NetJunkie

    NetJunkie New Member

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    What I want to know, and this goes for Gold Rush too, is how anyone made money doing this when gold wasn't $1500/oz? I know it's caused a new gold rush (we're seeing there too in NC) but still...some of these mines have been in constant operation when gold was worth far less.
     
  16. vertigo235

    vertigo235 Well-Known Member TCF Club

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    I doubt the hut is where they live, i think it's just a temp housing while they work.

    I can't imagine it's even possible to live in that thing during the winter!
     
  17. jradosh

    jradosh Newlywed

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    Herndon,...
    What does that even mean? :confused:
     
  18. justen_m

    justen_m Cheesehead

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    Boise, ID
    My brother got a MFA after his Bachelors, and then more degrees. I don't pretend to understand, but in his world (academia), degrees mean stuff. My world (engineers), whatever.
     
  19. Gary McCoy

    Gary McCoy Active Member

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    Yurts are insulated tents invented in Mongolia. The traditional covering is animal hide and the traditional insulation a combination of felt and loose animal fur. They are heated with a central fire.

    Those commercial yurts for sale in America share the shape but little else - they use plastic skins, an aluminum bubble insulation/vapor barrier, and sewn fabric liners, with a central wood stove or propane furnace. Both the floors and roof are insulated, frequently with closed-cell foam.

    You better believe you can use a Yurt in Winter, and quite comfortably. Just as you can survive an Artic blizzard in an ice dome called an igloo. The inside igloo temperature is about 25 degrees, which is fifty degrees warmer than outside, and sheltered from the wind. We had an Arctic survival course that included igloo construction.

    Any shelter that lacks corners is good in extreme cold. Rectangular structures are hard to keep heated.
     
  20. vertigo235

    vertigo235 Well-Known Member TCF Club

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    Charlotte
    Cool
     

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