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Bell Labs achieves 10gbs over crappy copper!!!

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by trip1eX, Jul 11, 2014.

  1. trip1eX

    trip1eX Active Member

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    This is for Bigg. :D

    Alcatel-Lucent's Bell Labs has managed to set a new world record for data transmission over copper lines — you know, the presumably "crappy" copper connection between your house and a local node, and the very thing that your ISP is likely balking at ever replacing with fiber-optic connectivity, due to the cost.
    In other words, no crazy-fast Internet for you. Well. At least until now.

    Bell Labs was able to reach a top speed of 10 gigabits per second over copper wire using a prototype technology it calls "XG-FAST," the successor to its previous "G.fast" technology that is currently being ratified by the International Telecommunication Union. To do so, Bell Labs had to kick the frequency range it was using to 500 MHz — more than double that of the 212 MHz used by G.fast, and leagues beyond that used by G.fast's predecessor, VDLS 2 (which uses anywhere from 17-30 MHz).

    Bell Labs's breakthrough could presumably reduce the cost of fiber-optic network rollouts, as the fiber connectivity could be extended simply to a point where copper could take over. Neighborhoods, for example, wouldn't all need fiber-optic lines strung to the doors of each and every house; the existing copper infrastructure could be used to carry the signal through the "last mile."
    But the increased frequency range, which enables Bell Labs to stuff a lot more data through the copper, comes with a cost: In its tests, Bell Labs was only able to sustain the 10 Gbps speeds for a total of 30 meters, or 100 feet. It (naturally) got a bit more room out of its slower 1Gbps symmetrical connection, which was consistent up to just around 70 meters (230 feet).

    "The Bell Labs speed record is an amazing achievement, but crucially in addition they have identified a new benchmark for 'real-world' applications for ultra-broadband fixed access," Federico Guillén, president of Alcatel-Lucent's fixed networks business, said in a statement. "XG-FAST can help operators accelerate FTTH deployments, taking fiber very close to customers without the major expense and delays associated with entering every home. By making 1 gigabit symmetrical services over copper a real possibility, Bell Labs is offering the telecommunications industry a new way to ensure no customer is left behind when it comes to ultra-broadband access."

    That said, don't hold your breath for XG-FAST to hit your local ISP anytime soon. G.fast is expected to become commercially available in 2015, and it'll likely require ISPs to run fiber "a bit closer to the home," according to PCMag's sister site, ExtremeTech. That'll put a bit of a cost burden on ISPs, but perhaps not as much as XG-FAST, which will require an even closer fiber connection in order to benefit from the fastest speeds.

    http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2460682,00.asp
     
  2. aridon

    aridon Member

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    30 meters? Cool but impractical. Just like all the "cures" and other things you hear about that never come around to be useful.
     
  3. tarheelblue32

    tarheelblue32 Active Member

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    30 meters eh? My driveway is longer than that.
     
  4. dlfl

    dlfl Cranky old novice

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    Dayton OH
    Don't you love weasel wording like:

    ".. a bit closer to the home" and ".. a bit of a cost burden".

    That's the spin of those promoting the stuff -- not those paying for it.

    Even so, I'd like to think there eventually may be some hope along these or similar lines for those of us in neighborhoods where fiber won't get anywhere near our homes for at least decades.
     
  5. pjw150

    pjw150 New Member

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    So even if it would be 5 Gbps at 200 feet, I could live with that.
     
  6. tarheelblue32

    tarheelblue32 Active Member

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    That would imply a linear drop off of performance. I have a feeling that performance drop off would be more exponential in nature.
     
  7. SNJpage1

    SNJpage1 Well-Known Member

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    Atlantic...
    The problem is copper has too many places where it could be bad. Every splice is a possible corrosion problem.
     
  8. aridon

    aridon Member

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    Like said above the drop off is likely exponential but regardless even if it wasn't, dropping that many VRADs every 500-1k ft is ridiculous. See Uverse as an example.
     
  9. Worf

    Worf Active Member

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    At 30m, I think the real purpose is for apartments and the like where there's a central room with all the telecommunications equipment in it, and to there it's fiber. From there it goes over copper to the apartment because running fiber into each apartment gets expensive, quick.

    It makes no sense in lower density dwellings as if you can run fiber there, you are basically done. But in older apartments where running new lines is hard, it's an option.
     
  10. Diana Collins

    Diana Collins Well-Known Member TCF Club

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    One of the biggest marketing problems with any use of existing cable plants is the inability to provide an accurate prediction of performance. DSL, as sold today, is a typical example. Many DSL installations are great...adequate, if not better, performance and reliability. The problem is that many are also terrible. While distance from a CO is a major factor, two houses the same distance from the CO may have vastly different performance depending on the particular pairs used and their condition.

    This is as opposed to coaxial, fiber or satellite which can provide very accurate predictions of bandwidth prior to sale. It is hard to sell a service when your agreement with the customer can't be specific about the service level you are actually going to provide.
     
  11. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    The article specifically says they were able to get 1Gbps at 230 feet. The typical distance from the fiber node to the home is actually closer to 1000 feet. At those distances they may not even be able to hit 100Mbps.
     
  12. tarheelblue32

    tarheelblue32 Active Member

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    The distance from AT&T's VRAD to my house is 2500 feet, which is why I told the U-verse door-to-door salesman to get lost.
     
  13. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    This is not that uncommon either. Most people are around 1000 feet, but distances of 2500 or more still exist, especially in neighborhoods with underground wiring.
     

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