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Bad news for Tivo and Chromecast owners?

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by siratfus, Mar 18, 2014.

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  1. Bigg

    Bigg Active Member

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    This. I have Roku, TiVo, AppleTV, and an HTPC, among others. Now this is making me want a Chromecast :).
     
  2. rainwater

    rainwater Active Member

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    Chromecast just got Vudu support if you have an android device. If you aren't using the free Prime streaming from Amazon and just use it to rent movies, then Vudu is a good option.
     
  3. JosephB

    JosephB Member

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    Amazon's money is in the content, not the device. They are playing the opposite game that Apple is playing. They are making their own box, but it's in their interest to have their content on as many boxes as possible. That's why there is a Kindle app for every platform even though they sell hardware Kindles of every stripe.
     
  4. Grakthis

    Grakthis New Member

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    If your firewall is setup in such a way that the Chromecast cannot stream, then your firewall is broken. It's a non-functional firewall. A firewall should only block EXTERNAL connections from initiating data transfers INTO your network. It should not block internal devices from initiating streams externally.

    I am guessing you are not communicating something correctly here because what you're saying doesn't make much sense unless your router/firewall is configured badly or is REALLY old.

    *shrug*

    Beta code. I hope you didn't buy it for beta code?

    It's a very limited device to the apps it has. Yep. But the apps it has work PERFECTLY and fast and better than anything else on the market, hands down.

    the browser casting should not be considered a full fledged feature. It's a "hey, maybe this works sometimes?" feature. It's not supposed to be anything more than that.

    The roku is brutally slow, compared to the chromecast. That's the tradeoff... it's remote controlled, does a lot, but is slow as molasses to get to content. Love the roku's flexibility, but frustrated by the interface.
     
  5. Grakthis

    Grakthis New Member

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    What is the deal there? Is Comecast just not on-board with HBOGO? I think the way it works is, they have to pay-in to the HBOGO service, like it's a channel, right? It's not something they turn off. They have to buy it from HBO, right?
     
  6. tarheelblue32

    tarheelblue32 Active Member

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    The deal is that Comcast is just being a dick. HBOGO is included with an HBO subscription, HBO just needs user authentication information provided by the cable company to allow access. Comcast allows their HBO subscribers to use the HBOGO app on the iPad, iPhone, Apple TV, XBOX, Android devices, Kindle Fire, and Samsung Smart TVs. So HBO clearly has access to Commcast's subscriber authentication information, because they use it to grant access on all those other devices. Literally all Comcast has to do is call up HBO and say "okay, go ahead and allow the Roku app to work for Comcast subscribers". Comcast just refuses to give their permission for the Roku app. All the other cable companies allow the use of the Roku app, just not Comcast. My guess is that Roku won't cough up the money that Comcast wants out of them to give their permission for it to be used.
     
  7. tarheelblue32

    tarheelblue32 Active Member

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    It is a known issue that some routers' default settings do not allow the Chromecast to work. That is why Google maintains a router compatibility list of routers that are known to work with Chromecast by default:

    https://support.google.com/chromecast/table/3477832?hl=en

    Notice that some routers on the list do not support Chromecast by default and you have to change certain advanced settings to get it to work.


    I have not found this to be true. I have the Roku 3 and it is very fast and responsive. As for the remote, I don't have a smartphone, so what else besides a remote would I be using?
     
  8. Hercules67

    Hercules67 TiVo addict

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    I read the posts here and I am completely confused by the problems users seem to be having, although, truthfully, I do not subscribe to HBO and have not tried casting HBOtoGO yet (but Intend to eventually), I own a Chromecast, and have ZERO issues with it.

    I have used it with Pandora.
    I have used it with YouTube.
    I have used it with Plex Media Server.

    Everything I cast to ii, I have streamed without problem, and my PC and Router are ages old (as in 10 years old), which by internet standards, are like Paleolithic.

    So, how come people are having issues?

    How can I help people use my set-up to fix theirs?
     
  9. Bigg

    Bigg Active Member

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    The biggest thing that makes me leery of Chromecast is not only that you can't hardwire it like Roku or AppleTV, but that it doesn't have 5ghz wireless. Everything else I have is hardwired, so I don't have to worry about the wifi getting messed up while streaming. I'll still probably get one eventually, since I love gadgets, and it's hard to resist $35.
     
  10. Grakthis

    Grakthis New Member

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    Yeah, wow. That's kind of messed up. I would write lots of angry letters to Comcast over that... it wouldn't help, but you know.
     
  11. Grakthis

    Grakthis New Member

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    Ah, I see what it is... it's not the Chromecast getting out, it's the phone communicating with the chromecast. It uses multicast and some routers aren't allowing multicast between devices on the network, or aren't doing it properly. Which is preventing the phone from either communicating commands or, more likely, scanning the network for available chromecast devices.

    That makes a lot more sense than what I was thinking before...


    Right. So, having a smart phone would be step 1. And once you have a smart phone, navigating with the smart phone is much easier than using a remote, even on a responsive device. Remotes are just more clunky than smart phones when navigating online video and audio services.
     
  12. Bigg

    Bigg Active Member

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    I beg to differ. I have the apps for all my devices, and I RARELY use them for direct control. I used to use the iOS app for typing on TiVo before I got a Slide Pro. Other than that, they are pretty useless. I don't want to drain down my iPhone, or have it's bright screen on, or have no physical buttons when I'm trying to watch something. Dedicated remotes are here to stay. Smartphones are a total kludge for most remote control applications. I could see the usefulness if they offer better catalog navigation, but once you find what you want, back to the physical remote... However, in most cases, I can just look up what I want online, and then use the physical remote to search for it. Also, I use the TiVo app a lot for scheduling, but not for direct control...
     
  13. Bigg

    Bigg Active Member

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    I can't figure out why they haven't gotten Roku to work... There's no obvious motive to block it if they support other devices, so I have to assume it's just plain incompetence... given that it's Comcast, I wouldn't be surprised.
     
  14. tarheelblue32

    tarheelblue32 Active Member

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    It's not just incompetence. Comcast executives have made a deliberate decision not to support anything on Roku. I remember reading some official statement from Comcast on the issue and it was intentionally vague and full of crap on why they haven't done it yet.
     
  15. gweempose

    gweempose Active Member

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    Yeah, the Comcast/Roku thing is really annoying. It's not just HBO GO. You can't access Showtime Anytime either. I originally thought that Comcast took this stance because they didn't want it to take away from their On Demand revenue, but now that they allow it on so many other devices, it's clearly not about that. I agree that it's probably a shakedown, and Roku refuses to cough up the dough.

    In response to the comments about remotes, I'll take a well laid out hard button remote any day over a smartphone. I personally can't stand touch screen remotes. I like to be able to operate my remote by feel without looking at it. Give me something like this, and I'm truly happy:

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Bigg

    Bigg Active Member

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    Do they see it as some sort of threat to their video business? That the Apple TV isn't?
     
  17. tarheelblue32

    tarheelblue32 Active Member

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    My best guess is that Comcast wants to shake down any device manufacturer who wants Comcast customers to have access to the HBOGO app on their device, and Roku isn't willing to cough up the money. It will be interesting to see how long it takes the new Amazon FireTV to get the HBOGO app and how long it will take Comcast to allow their customers to use it.
     
  18. gweempose

    gweempose Active Member

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    If Comcast can successfully shakedown Netflix, they must laugh at a tiny fish like RoKu. Comcast is a behemoth, and they will only become more powerful once they swallow up TWC.
     
  19. Bigg

    Bigg Active Member

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    That doesn't make any sense. My suspicion would be some arcane authentication system that they use has some issue with the way Roku authenticates and bunch of engineers at the two companies are in a standoff about who has to modify what to make it work... it's probably way more boring than the conspiracy theories you like to put forward...
     
  20. tarheelblue32

    tarheelblue32 Active Member

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    That doesn't make any sense to me, as the HBOGO app authenticates through HBO, not directly through Comcast. Yes, HBO has to then turn around and get the authentication information from Comcast, but I'm pretty sure that if HBO can get the information from Comcast for AppleTVs, XBOXs, and Samsung Smart TV apps, that HBO could get it to activate a Roku app the exact same way if only Comcast would give its permission to do so.
     
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